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Date a Boy Who Travels

Hoover Dam Mustang

Date a boy who treasures experience over toys, a hand-woven bracelet over a Rolex. Date the boy who scoffs when he hears the words, “vacation”, “all-inclusive”, or “resort”. Date a boy who travels because he’s not blinded by a single goal but enlivened by many.

You might find him in an airport or at a book store browsing the travel guides – although he “only uses them for reference.”

You’ll know it’s him because when you peek at his computer screen, his background will be a scenic splendor of rolling hills, mountains, or prayer flags. His Facebook friend count will be over-the-roof, and his wall will be plastered with the broken English ‘miss-you’ of friends he met along the way. When he travels, he makes lifelong friends in an hour. And although contact with these friends is sporadic and may be far-between, his bonds are un-messable and if he wanted, he could couch surf the world… again.

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Nameless Fedora 21 Linux is an Opportunity for Growth

Fedora Linux Logo

The Red Hat-sponsored Fedora Linux community recently celebrated its 10th anniversary, capping off a decade of releases and evolution. In 2014, Fedora could be in store for its biggest evolution since the project’s creation, with fewer releases and even a new naming strategy.

Typically, the Fedora project has had two releases in any given year: one in the early spring, the other early winter. For 2014, that likely won’t be the case.

Fedora 20 was released on Dec. 17, 2013, and its successor won’t debut until August 2014.

Another key change in the Fedora Linux world is the naming strategy for new releases. The Fedora project has chosen some interesting names for its Linux distribution releases in recent years. The Fedora 20 release was named Heisenbug, Fedora 19 was called Schrodinger’s Cat, Fedora 18 was the Spherical Cow, and Fedora 17 was the Beefy Miracle.

This could be interesting…

Source

Nurse reveals the top FIVE regrets people make on their deathbed

Henry

For many years I worked in palliative care. My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last three to twelve weeks of their lives. People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality.

I learned never to underestimate someone’s capacity for growth. Some changes were phenomenal. Each experienced a variety of emotions, as expected, denial, fear, anger, remorse, more denial and eventually acceptance. Every single patient found their peace before they departed though, every one of them.

When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, common themes surfaced again and again.

Here are the most common five…

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Banksy Recent Residency in New York 2013

Skooba Laptop Weekender Travel Bag. An awesome carry-on bag for gadget lovers.

I go somewhere on a plane at least twice a month. For over ten years I’ve used a Briggs & Riley roller carry-on, and I’ve been fairly happy with it. It’s heavy for its small size and the zipper pulls all broke off (I made replacements from binder clips and Sugru) so I’ve been keeping my eye out for a replacement. After hearing great things about the accessibility and capacity of the Skooba Weekender duffle, I decided to give it a try. It turned out the be the most convenient carry-on I’ve ever used.

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Facebook Ignored Whitehat’s Bug Report, Then Gets Owned

Mark Zuckerberg wall

Khalil, a Palestinian white hat hacker, submitted bug reports to Facebook about a vulnerability that allowed him to post on anyone’s wall. But Facebook’s security team didn’t do anything. So Khalil wrote on Mark Zuckerberg’s wall about it and was generally reasonable.

Khalil explains on his blog that he submitted a full description of the bug, plus follow-up proof of its existence to the Facebook security feedback page, where researchers can win rewards of at least $500 for finding significant vulnerabilities. Then he submitted again. The second time he got an e-mail back that said, “I am sorry this is not a bug.”

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Electric Amphibious Drink Delivery Vehicle

electric amphibious drink delivery vehicle

What’s a pool party without an amphibious RC vehicle designed for delivering drinks on land or down to the deep end?

“With a push of a button, it transforms from sea craft to rugged, 4-wheeled land vehicle. While in land mode, the wheel wells can be used to hold up to four beverage cans. Plus, an on-board water cannon can blast a stream of water at any target. . .”

Buy now.

Explore The World’s Tallest Building With Google Street View

Google Street View is useful for all sorts of awesome reasons: You can virtually visit the Galapagos Islands, create addicting travel games, and catch strangers’ candid moments, just to name a few.

But here’s a new one to add to the list: You can now experience life inside the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai.

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John McAfee Teaches How To Uninstall McAfee Antivirus

McAfee anti-virus is great though.

It just uses 100% CPU usage, so viruses don’t get any CPU time to execute.

It’s perfect.

Martha Hacks Her Ankle Monitor

Martha Stewart was in an interview with Vanity Fair when she made this remark. By merely saying this, I bet she violated some intellectual property law somewhere.ankle monitor

Asked about the electronic monitoring device she must wear on her ankle — she has complained repeatedly that it irritates her skin — Stewart says she knows how to remove it.“I watched them put it on. You can figure out how to get it off,” she is quoted as saying. “It’s on the Internet. I looked it up.”

Her publicist’s eyes “widened with alarm” when Stewart made the remark. The article didn’t say whether Stewart claimed ever to have taken off the device.

Her attorney is likely dead from a heart attack by now.

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FBI claims default use of HTTPS by Google and Facebook has made it difficult to wiretape

Facebook logo

A government task force is preparing legislation that would pressure companies such as Face­book and Google to enable law enforcement officials to intercept online communications as they occur, according to current and former U.S. officials familiar with the effort.

Driven by FBI concerns that it is unable to tap the Internet communications of terrorists and other criminals, the task force’s proposal would penalize companies that failed to heed wiretap orders — court authorizations for the government to intercept suspects’ communications.

Or so they want you to think…

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Apple’s iMessage encryption trips up feds’ surveillance

DEA badgeThe fuss iMessage’s encryption has created answers a question that I’ve often pondered. It’d be trivial to build powerful, public key encryption into our email programs. The first messages would exchange keys and from that point on, every email would be private. Why hasn’t that been done? Probably because anyone who talks about creating such an app gets a visit from spooky people in the FBI or DEA.

An internal Drug Enforcement Administration document seen by CNET discusses a February 2013 criminal investigation and warns that because of the use of encryption, “it is impossible to intercept iMessages between two Apple devices” even with a court order approved by a federal judge.

The DEA’s warning, marked “law enforcement sensitive,” is the most detailed example to date of the technological obstacles — FBI director Robert Mueller has called it the “Going Dark” problem — that police face when attempting to conduct court-authorized surveillance on non-traditional forms of communication.

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15 Dangerously Mad Projects for the Evil Genius

15 Dangerously Mad Projects for the Evil GeniusA few months ago I had fun playing with Simon Monk’s 30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius, and noticed that his 15 Dangerously Mad Projects included a coil gun… and I’ve always wanted to make a coil gun!

Since the coil is wrapped around the tube from a plastic pen, and the iron projectile is inside the tube, it will fly along towards the coil. As all the energy from the capacitors will be spent in a matter of milliseconds, the coil should ideally be turned off by the time the projectile passes its center and exits out the other side of the tube.

Simon’s plans and walk-through are wonderful. I learned a lot reading the detailed but easy to understand instructions. He also selects parts and components that I am sure I can source locally and I love that he improvised brackets from a plastic drinking bottle.

I also learned that I will not be making a coil gun. That curiosity is now satisfied!

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Bing Translate is awesome

Ron Paul wants to expropriate RonPaul.com from his supporters without compensation

Ron Paul

Earlier today, Ron Paul filed an international UDRP complaint against RonPaul.com and RonPaul.org with WIPO, a global governing body that is an agency of the United Nations. The complaint calls on the agency to expropriate the two domain names from his supporters without compensation and hand them over to Ron Paul.

On May 1st, 2008 we launched a grassroots website at RonPaul.com that became one of the most popular resources dedicated exclusively to Ron Paul and his ideas. Like thousands of fellow Ron Paul supporters, we put our lives on hold and invested 5 years of hard work into Ron Paul, RonPaul.com and Ron Paul 2012. Looking back, we are very happy with what we were able to achieve with unlimited enthusiasm and limited financial resources…

…At the same time we offered him RonPaul.org as a free gift so we could keep using RonPaul.com and he wouldn’t have to use something like RonPaulsHomePage.com.

Incredibly, Ron Paul’s lawyers are trying to use our FREE offer of RonPaul.org against us in an attempt to demonstrate “bad faith” on our part!

Of course, they also offered to sell him the .com domain and their mailing list for $250k.
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Watch the motorcycle marriage proposal that shut down a Los Angeles freeway

Cyclists in Los Angeles effectively closed the 10 freeway in West Covina for about ten minutes on Sunday, as one of them proposed to his girlfriend in a cloud of pink smoke. Apparently, she loved it. The California Highway Patrol did not. The biker club members face possible citations including impeding or blocking traffic. LA Times has more. Looks like it was these guys, and the lovebirds have been identified by multiple local news outlets as Hector Martinez and Paige Hernandez.

Understanding Lenses: The Book

The Lens book

The wonderful photographer and writer NKG writes:

As photographers and geeks we tend to obsess about the products we buy. Countless hours are spent poring over catalogues, reading reviews, arguing in forums. All to find the perfect camera. There’s just one thing missing here: the /lens/ is also a key part in creating high-quality images. But learning about interchangeable camera lenses, and all the strange arcane terminology that goes with them, can be very difficult. Hence “The Lens: a Practical Guide for the Creative Photographer.” It explains all the things you actually need to know about lenses, and why.

Why is a lens “fast” or “slow”? Why are seemingly similar lenses so different in price? Why is there alphabet soup printed on the side of the lens barrel? Every type of lens is described in practical terms, and there’s even a section on breaking out of manufacturer-dictated choices – how to adapt and modify lenses to fit incompatible cameras!

Published by Rocky Nook and distributed, in trade paperback or DRM-free, by O’Reilly.

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Televised police chase zips past man recording it on his TV

A guy was purportedly recording a police chase on TV when the chase went right by his house.

Remixable video of Norway’s four seasons from a train

Eirik Solheim is an amazing geek and CC activist at NRK, the Norwegian public broadcaster. He writes, “We filmed a train ride four times. One time for each season; winter, spring, summer and autumn. Then we used an accurate GPS-track to sync the four videos using some clever programming in combination with after effects. Giving us endless possibilities for spectacular video footage. You can watch it on the web, but we have also made it available for everyone to download in full HD — and licensed it with Creative Commons so that you can edit, remix and share!”

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Easiest excuse for taking freedom: security

Playmobil security checkpointHere, in concise and precise language, is the best pricking of the security bubble I’ve seen…

Security is an ideal language for suppressing rights because it combines a universality and neutrality in rhetoric with a particularity and partiality in practice. Security is a good that everyone needs, and, we assume, that everyone needs in the same way and to the same degree. It is “the most vital of all interests,” John Stuart Mill wrote, which no one can “possibly do without.” Though Mill was referring here to the security of persons rather than of nations or states, his argument about personal security is often extended to nations and states, which are conceived to be persons writ large.

Unlike other values — say justice or equality — the need for and definition of security is not supposed to be dependent upon our beliefs or other interests and it is not supposed to favor any one set of beliefs or interests. It is the necessary condition for the pursuit of any belief or interest, regardless of who holds that belief or has that interest. It is a good, as I’ve said, that is universal and neutral. That’s the theory.

The reality, as we have seen, is altogether different. The practice of security involves a state that is rife with diverse and competing ideologies and interests, and these ideologies and interests fundamentally help determine whether threats become a focus of attention, and how they are perceived and mobilized against. The provision of security requires resources, which are not limitless. They must be distributed according to some calculus, which, like the distribution calculus of any other resource (say income or education), will reflect controversial and contested assumption about justice and will be the subject of debate. National security is as political as Social Security, and just as we argue about the latter, so do we argue about the former.

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